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Posts Tagged ‘Business Insider’

Here’s your best look at the iPhone 8 based on all the rumors

iPhone 8 MKBHD (3)MKBHD/YouTube

Tech YouTuber Marques Brownlee, also known as MKBHD, got his hands on a dummy model of Apple’s next-generation iPhone, which has so far been known as the iPhone 8.The dummy iPhone 8 model is a culmination of all the rumors and “leaked” details surrounding the iPhone 8’s design. It’s essentially a physical rumor.

As credible and reputable as the rumors’ sources are, this is not the iPhone 8. It’s just a dummy, and the special iPhone that Apple will reportedly unveil during its iPhone event in September could be totally different.

Still, it’s interesting to see a physical manifestation of the rumors we’ve heard.

Check out Brownlee’s iPhone 8 dummy, and his video at the bottom:

View As: One Page Slides

 

YouTuber Marque Brownlee, or MKBHD, got a hold of an iPhone 8 dummy that’s based on all the credible rumors about the iPhone 8.

YouTuber Marque Brownlee, or MKBHD, got a hold of an iPhone 8 dummy that's based on all the credible rumors about the iPhone 8.

YouTube/MKBHD

Brownlee edited the iOS 11 home screen onto the dummy model using Adobe’s After Effects software to see what the phone might look like while powered on.

Brownlee edited the iOS 11 home screen onto the dummy model using Adobe's After Effects software to see what the phone might look like while powered on.

YouTube/MKBHD

The screen is supposedly an OLED display, which looks a lot better than the LCD display on previous iPhones. We know OLED displays are better because Samsung’s Galaxy S8 has an OLED display, and it’s much nicer than the iPhone 7’s display. The colors on OLED displays are more vivid and the color black is deeper, which makes for astounding contrast.

The iPhone 8’s display will purportedly have a 1125 x 2436 resolution, which is sharper than the 1080p resolution on the iPhone 7 Plus.

As rumors claim, the iPhone 8 will have an edge-to-edge display that does away with the majority of the borders around the current iPhone’s display. It makes for a higher screen-to-body ratio that’s becoming more prevalent in flagship smartphones, like the Galaxy S8.

As rumors claim, the iPhone 8 will have an edge-to-edge display that does away with the majority of the borders around the current iPhone's display. It makes for a higher screen-to-body ratio that's becoming more prevalent in flagship smartphones, like the Galaxy S8.

YouTube/MKBHD

Brownlee also noted how recent rumors are pointing towards a 3D facial recognition system for unlocking the iPhone 8 instead of a Touch ID fingerprint sensor.

And it’ll have a “notch” at the top for sensors and the front-facing camera. This is probably where the rumored 3D facial-recognition camera would be located.

And it'll have a "notch" at the top for sensors and the front-facing camera. This is probably where the rumored 3D facial-recognition camera would be located.

YouTube/MKBHD

As the rumors claim, the iPhone 8 is said to come with a glass back, much like the iPhone 4 and 4S, versus the metal backs we’ve seen since the release of the iPhone 6.

As the rumors claim, the iPhone 8 is said to come with a glass back, much like the iPhone 4 and 4S, versus the metal backs we've seen since the release of the iPhone 6.

YouTube/MKBHD

Apart from being a throwback to the glass-backed iPhone 4 and 4s design, the glass back on the iPhone 8 would allow for wireless charging, which has been one of the biggest rumors as of late.

Having a glass back also eliminates the need for antenna lines, which are one of the least popular design features in the iPhone 6, 6s, and 7.

Some rumors say the iPhone 8 will have metal edges.

Some rumors say the iPhone 8 will have metal edges.

YouTube/MKBHD

We’ve also heard about a new vertical design for the dual-lens camera system. On the iPhone 7 Plus, the dual-lens camera is oriented horizontally.

We've also heard about a new vertical design for the dual-lens camera system. On the iPhone 7 Plus, the dual-lens camera is oriented horizontally.

YouTube/MKBHD

Remember, this is only a dummy, and it’s essentially the same thing as a rumor.

Remember, this is only a dummy, and it's essentially the same thing as a rumor.

MKBHD/YouTube

Nothing about the iPhone 8 is certain until Apple itself reveals the final details. We expect Apple to announce the device during its annual iPhone event in September.

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Should you be scared of Amazon?

jeff bezosAmazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Amazon bought Whole Foods on Friday for $13.7 billion.REUTERS/Abhishek N. Chinnappa
AMZN Amazon.Com

About a month ago, New York Times columnist Farhad Manjoo helped coin a new term for the top-five tech companies that are increasingly dominating our lives: The Frightful Five, better known as Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook.

The top of his list? Amazon.

Farhad’s argument was that he’s increasingly dependent on Amazon for buying stuff and entertaining his family. That’s true.

But I’d argue Amazon’s reach goes deeper than that, deeper than any other company inside or outside the tech world. And its grip on our lives is only getting stronger, which raises some serious questions we haven’t had to ask ourselves about the power and influence a tech company can have over our lives.

Out of the Frightful Five, Amazon is the company you should fear the most.

Amazon’s surprise $13.7 billion acquisition of Whole Foods is the latest example. We already knew Amazon had ambitions to break into the grocery business through the Amazon Fresh delivery service and the futuristic cashier-free convenience stores, but this is a whole other level — a subtle troll that the online retail giant can creep its way back into the physical world and take over a popular chain of supermarkets.

But let’s talk about everything else Amazon has its grip on and how it continues to hold greater influence over:

  • Cloud computing. Amazon Web Services powers many of the apps and websites you use every day. (Remember when an Amazon outage took down a large chunk of the internet?)
  • Artificial intelligence. Amazon has quickly become a leader in AI thanks to its Alexa assistant, which has opened up a new world of voice-powered computing.
  • Logistics. Through Amazon Air, Amazon plans to use drones and its own planes to deliver goods. It’s also experimenting with autonmous trucking. Many have speculated that one day Amazon won’t need to rely on UPS, FedEX, or the Postal Service to deliver stuff.
  • Entertainment. Amazon has dumped millions into original TV programming and movies. It also runs a streaming music service, and lets you buy digital music and video.
  • Food. Between Whole Foods, those futuristic grocery stores, and the Fresh delivery service, Amazon is poised to be one of the largest grocers in the country.
  • Health. According to a CNBC report, Amazon is thinking about getting it the prescription drug business.
  • Retail and e-commerce. This one is self-explanatory.

There’s more. Amazon’s influence extends to other industries indirectly through CEO Jeff Bezos’ personal investments:

  • News media. Bezos owns The Washington Post and a small percentage of Business Insider.
  • Outer space. Bezos owns a rocket company, Blue Origin, that’s building reusable rockets.

That’s a lot of stuff that affects you every day from a company that started selling books online back in the 90s. Now it’s hard to find a need Amazon can’t fill.

That raises some serious, potentially scary questions if Amazon’s influence and capabilities continue to grow. Should one conglomerate have that level of control over the future of so many vital industries people rely on? What kind of check will there be on that power, if any?

Granted, it’s a little early to be thinking about all this. Most of the verticals Amazon is involved in are still dominated by traditional companies. But as we saw in the market’s reaction to the Whole Foods deal on Friday, it’s clear that there’s a strong possibility we’re accelerating toward a future where there’s a digital layer on top of everything we do. And the company best equipped to deliver all is Amazon. There’s literally no one else in a position to compete.

That’s a lot of power concentrated in one conglomerate, and puts Amazon in a position where it’s a company to fear.

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Microsoft’s new standalone keyboard has one the best new features from Apple’s MacBook Pro

One of the best new features that Apple added to its 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro is a Touch ID fingerprint scanner on the keyboard. And now, Microsoft has also added a fingerprint scanner on its new Modern Keyboard to work with Windows 10 computers.

microsoft modern keyboardYouTube/Microsoft

The fingerprint sensor on Microsoft new $129 Modern Keyboard, called Fingerprint ID, has its own button on the right of the right “Alt” key.

Microsoft already offers an easy keyboard-less way to unlock your computer called Windows Hello, which uses a webcam and facial recognition to unlock your computer. That’s great for computers that have built-in webcams, which many laptops have. However, the monitor I use on my Windows 10 desktop doesn’t have a built-in webcam, so I can’t use Windows Hello. And because typing in a password every time I want to unlock my computer is a pain, I don’t use a password, which is a terrible, insecure idea.

Microsoft’s new Modern Keyboard with a fingerprint scanner is the solution.

windows hello Windows Hello on a Windows 10 computer. YouTube/Microsoft

Touch ID on the MacBook Pro, and now Microsoft’s new Modern Keyboard, cuts out the need to type in your password to log in to your computer. If that doesn’t seem like a big deal, look at your smartphone and imagine if you had to tap in your PIN number every time you wanted to unlock it instead of using its fingerprint scanner. Seems like a pain, doesn’t it?

It might be true that you don’t unlock your computer as often as you unlock your smartphone, but your computer password if likely longer than your smartphone PIN, which could include four to six numbers. With that in mind, the fingerprint scanner on Microsoft’s new keyboard is a great shortcut to unlock your computer.

The Modern Keyboard costs $129 and will be available to buy soon.

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The creator of Android explains how his new phone can take on Apple and Samsung

Andy Rubin at wired business conference Andy Rubin at the Wired Business Conference with the new Essential Phone. Getty Images for Wired

Andy Rubin is best known as the guy who created Android, sold it to Google, and nurtured it into the most popular smartphone operating system on the planet.

But Rubin left Google back in 2014, and now he’s on his own.

His latest gig is Essential, a startup he runs as CEO that’s trying to become a new kind of gadgets company. It starts with a phone, called the Essential PH-1, and the plan is to expand into smart appliances and cars from there.

Rubin spoke Wednesday at the Wired Business Conference in New York and shed a bit more light on Essential’s plans. After the Essential Phone launches this summer, the company plans to release Home, a voice-controlled hub for all the connected appliances in your house. Rubin claims Home will be compatible with the wide variety of smart home platforms, ranging from Apple’s HomeKit to Samsung’s SmartThings, even though it’d take a wild level of technical wizardy to pull it off. Many are skeptical he can pull it off. He calls this new platform Ambient OS.

Beyond that, Rubin teased that he’d like Essential to tackle the car, which is increasingly coming into focus as an area of growth for tech companies.

And questions remain how the Essential Phone, which costs $699, can find success in a market dominated by Apple and Samsung.

Business Insider and some other members of the press spoke with Rubin following his Wired talk. Below is a transcript of that conversation, which has been edited for length and clarity. (I’ve labeled each journalist’s question as just “Question” since so many people were in the room asking questions. I put my name on the questions I asked.)

Q&A with Andy Rubin, CEO of Essential

Steve Kovach: I want to talk more about Ambient OS. You were talking a lot about how you’re really confident you’re going to be able to stitch all these various platforms together.

Andy Rubin: I didn’t say I was confident. I’m definitely going for it.

Kovach: If I’m understanding it correctly, especially with Apple, it’s actually impossible. What they allow people to build into now doesn’t allow what you want to do. Does this thing fall apart if they say no to you?

Rubin: You have to understand this approach. There’s a client and a server. And what Apple has with HomeKit is a bunch of individual consumer electronics companies enabling HomeKit with their products. I don’t know what the percentages are, but they don’t all only speak HomeKit. They speak a whole lot of other stuff as well. And what Apple is trying to do is trying to be the screen that drives these things. And that’s excluding anybody in “Android Land” or Windows from driving those things. So the natural effect will be for those companies to support other products as well, and they’re the ones that are plugging into Apple’s APIs. So the trick that I talked about on stage is: I can produce the same APIs. And I can call it Essential Kit. And those same exact APIs that someone has already developed for their Sonos thing or whatever this point product is, I’m compatible with.

Kovach: But isn’t that just another product like Samsung’s SmartThings?

Rubin: No, no, no, no. You know what this is? This is [like] Windows emulation [on a Mac]. This is Windows emulation for IoT. APIs for all these people who are building these islands. And if I emulate eight things and turn it on, I control 100,000 devices.

Kovach: And have you been able to do that yet in testing?

Rubin: I haven’t launched a product. I’m teasing a product, but it’s going to be awesome. These are all forward-looking statements.

Question: How far in advance are you teasing?

essential home hub A rendering of what Essential Home will look like. Essential

Rubin: We have round LCDs — big ones. What’s after that is basically everything that’s in a smartphone. Right? There’s a bunch of cool things about starting a company today. I have a system in my lobby where I can print badges for people. There’s some startup company whose job it is to do lobby registration now. And when I used to start companies, those guys didn’t exist. But the other thing that happened, obviously, is smartphones have driven the supply base, based on the volume of the component tree of smartphones. And you’ll find those things going into a lot of products like these home assistant products. So it’s kind of a new era as far as leveraging the economies of scale of smartphones into these other products.

Question: So Essential Home is a touch interface. Is it also a microphone?

Rubin: Yeah it has far-field speech recognition. It has an array of microphones.

Question: Is there any plan to add video chat to something like that?

Rubin: Really good question. So once you do this job of bridging these islands, you kind of rise above all these other UIs, and you become a kind of holistic UI for every other product that might be in your life. So if you think of it purely from a UI perspective: Who is your UI developer? I actually thing developing for smartphones is too difficult. It’s almost like you have to go to school to learn how to be an iOS developer or learn how to be an Android developer. The good ones have four or five years of experience, and the industry is not that old. So the reason we created a new OS is to basically solve the UI problem and redefine the definition of who a developer is. I want the guy who owns the home to be a developer, in some regard. I can tell you today, there’s a $13 billion industry of Crestron or AMX or Control 4, and they’re drilling holes in your wall and installing screens in your home. That’s an outdated approach. But the guys that are doing the UIs for those are the same guys that are drilling the holes in your wall. There’s this whole installer thing with these high-end homes which is not a mass-market consumer value proposition. So I need to change who the installer is. And I think we’ve built enough technology for a consumer to kind of do a drag and drop.

Question: There’s this argument that’s been out there that innovation in smartphones has peaked, that they’ve already gotten so good and can do so many things. Where do you see things going? Where does it go from here?

essential ph-1 colors The Essential Phone. Essential

Rubin: When there’s this duopoly with these two guys owning 40% of the market, this complacency sets in where people are like, “Oh what they’re building is good enough. I’ll just go to them.” And that’s the perfect time to start a company like this, when people are complacent and it needs to be disrupted. And the real answer is you guys and the consumers need to tell me if there’s enough new innovation in [the Essential Phone].

I think the 360 camera and the magnetic accessory bus is a pretty good example of the innovation we’re thinking about. And there’s gonna be a string of those things. Let me broadly position this: In the era where smartphones were new and everyone was upgrading from their feature phone to their smartphone for the first time, the product cycle was every six months. There’d be some new thing coming out, everyone’s excited, there was a bubble kind of feeling that you were involved in something completely new and exciting. And then once everybody who wanted a smartphone got one, we’re in a saturated market — at least in the first world. In saturated markets, the upgrade cycle is every 24 months. And the problem with the 24-month cycle, which happens to snap to the carriers’ [ownership] of the consumer, is the consumer doesn’t get to see the innovation. It’s still happening in the background, but it happens every 24 months in these very lumpy onstage announcements. I think there’s a way, and the reason we built this magnetic connector to continuously produce innovation and show it to the consumer happening in real time. It’s almost like software updates for hardware.

Andy Rubin at wired business conference Rubin and his Essential Phone. Getty Images for Wired

Question: Explain how the Essential Phone is different from a modular phone. From the consumer point of view, it’s, “I’m getting this phone and I can snap a camera on and I can snap on a better battery.” Does it matter if it’s magnetic or not?

Rubin: That’s a good question. It’s two things. It’s kind of the core to the way we designed this from a product design perspective. The first one is what’s “modular.” [Google] Ara was the definition of modular, which is you can remove a core component of the phone, like its processor, and replace it with a faster one. We’re not doing that. You buy a phone, the phone works great as a phone. We’re adding stuff onto it. So that’s why I prefer accessory bus as an example. So that’s modular versus accessory.

Now, connectors, in my view, are dumb because they get outdated. So a wireless connector is the holy grail. We’re close to that. We transmit power between two pins and everything else is wireless. Actually, the technology we’re using is wireless USB 3.0. So it’s 10 gigabits a second of USB, and we’ve built these transceivers that do that. The benefit of having a connectorless connector is I don’t suffer from what Moto Mod suffered from, which is every phone they come out with in the future has to have that 33-pin connector in exactly the same location so all the accessories you’ve invested in as a consumer still work. So they’ve painted themselves in the corner. They can never change the industrial design of their next phone because it has to match all these accessories. Or they have to trick the consumer into throwing away all their accessories and getting the new one that fits this new thing.

A completely wireless thing means I can come out with a phone that’s invisible. And as long as it has this magnetic area on it I can use this legacy of accessories that I’ve purchased. Again, this is a pro-consumer brand. It’s not easy to articulate. We’re trying to do right by the consumer where they don’t have to throw away their stuff every time there’s a connector change. Or get some weird dongle. True story, I went and bought one of those beautiful new MacBooks with the OLED TouchBar. And that’s when they changed to the USB-C thing. And in the IT department in my company I needed to plug in to the Ethernet to get the certificate for the new laptop, and I went to the Apple store and I said, “Do you have a USB-C to ethernet dongle?” And they said, “Oh no we don’t have that yet.” So I had to buy a USB-C to Thunderbolt dongle, and a Thunderbolt to Ethernet dongle. So I had two dongles plugged into each other. And that’s the point where I’m just not feeling too good about being a consumer of those products.

Question: Based on the conversations you had today and at the Code Conference, Essential is much more than just a phone company. How do you find that your brand is going to track these consumers?

Rubin: It’s anti-walled garden. We chose Android because that’s a big component of that. We have a team of engineers, a lot of them, doing the job of other people to make our products work with theirs. These other companies, especially the walled gardens, they’re sitting here with their ecosystem and they expect people to come to them. And they get to be the toll gate guys and say “yes” or “no.” So we’re actively going out and making our products work with other people’s products because we know that’s how our consumers want to live.

Kovach: You spoke a lot on stage today about home and the car as major new platforms, but you didn’t mention AR.

Rubin: There’s baby steps into AR, and then there’s all-in. Scoble’s all-in is the shower picture… so the glasses might come later. Cellphones have had augmented reality for a long time…

What the real question is: ‘What is the end product?’ What is the developer going to build with augmented reality? And so far I’ve seen interactive media… movies and game-like movies, where you’re both a participant and a viewer, which I think is a little too mixed reality for me. There’s a lean back where you’re a consumer of this stuff and it happens, or you’re a participant like a game. The mixed part of it hasn’t been proven yet.

I think when consumers are ready to wear things, whether it’s a motorcycle helmet that overlays a map… or if it’s some goggles that they’ll use for a board game… in the end for these big things I think…

One of the problems is the price. It’s just crazy. It’s not ready for prime time. There will be a day where you might have a head mounted display and it costs $199, and you just plug it into your cellphone. And it won’t be ‘I’m wearing this 24 hours a day.’ It’ll be, ‘It’s time to sit down and play Monopoly with the family or something.’ It actually might be more social than what you would do with VR.

Question: Is that why you started the 360 camera? Because it’s a taste of that?

Rubin: This is all speculation, but I’m hoping there’s going to be a format change in the future. I think I can kind of move the needle a little bit in that format change by taking the world’s largest mass-market product and adding something onto it, rather than trying to create something completely new. So it’s more of a slipstream approach.

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‘Not a random idea factory’: Why Facebook says its brain sensors are closer than you think

Regina Dugan Facebook’s Regina Dugan Facebook/Business Insider

Brain scanning and skin sensors sound like the stuff of science fiction.

And Facebook’s recently announced efforts to create this technology could easily be dismissed by cynics as a public relations stunt by a large company looking to prove its innovation bona fides.

But the 60 scientists and engineers working at Facebook’s “Building 8” — as the skunkworks hardware lab is known — are already making detailed plans for this sci-fi-like future.

Within 18 months, Building 8 hopes to have a working prototype of a brain sensor capable of typing 100 words a minute. And the group is drawing up plans to form a panel to examine the ethical implications of brain scanning.

Regina Dugan, head of Building 8, along with two members of her team, sat down with Business Insider to discuss the group’s progress to date and its plans for the future.

While Facebook’s ability to interface directly with the human brain is still years away from reality, Dugan and her team are serious about their work and its massive implications on Facebook’s businesses and society as a whole.

“We have an entire product launch team whose job it is to move out products at scale,” Dugan said.

Facebook chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer went out his way to stress the reality of Building 8’s efforts in a separate interview, telling BI that the point of the lab was not simply to have a “random idea factory” that never results in actual products.

Right now, the most pressing goal is to develop a working prototype in the next 18 months of a noninvasive brain sensor that’s capable of turning thoughts into text at 100 words a minute, according to Dugan. After that, Building 8’s next mission will be to figure out how to mass produce and sell the sensor.

Dugan, the former head of Google’s advanced projects group who joined Facebook in 2016, said that Facebook’s plans to form an ethics and legal panel with Building 8’s outside university partners to examine the privacy and health implications of brain scanning.

“This is early days,” said Mark Chevillet, the neuroscientist Dugan hired last year to led the brain-to-text project at Building 8. “We have some big challenges ahead of us.”

‘This is not a random idea factory’

12983910_10102777875412201_1824114153464567549_o From left: Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer, Regina Dugan, and Mark Zuckerberg. Facebook

Aside from the scientific and technology challenges behind communicating directly with the human brain, shipping and selling hardware to millions of people represents a new challenge for Facebook.

With Building 8, Dugan and Facebook appear to be taking a page from Alphabet’s X “moonshot” division, which is known for developing far-flung, futuristic products within fixed time frames before either shutting them down or spinning them out as standalone businesses.

Similarly, Building 8’s projects have two-year deadlines to determine whether they can be successfully shepherded from the prototype stage to consumers. Every product that comes out of Building 8 will align with Facebook’s broader mission to connect the world, according to Schroepfer.

“When we were talking to Regina about joining us, one of the conversations we had is, ‘Look, this is not a random idea factory to go do whatever the team wants to work on,'” Schroepfer told BI. “We want to focus people on things that are directly associated with the mission.”

“We were like, ‘If you deliver on this, we know what to do with it,'” he said. “It’s not just going to be some random tech demo. It’s going to go into our products and make a difference.”

Augmented reality and vibrating vests

The brain research that Building 8 is working on will eventually also influence Facebook’s efforts in virtual and augmented reality, the latter of which could one day replace smartphones by overlaying virtual information onto the real world.

“It has huge applications for communication and connection, which is part of our mission,” said Schroepfer of Building 8’s brain-to-computer – or “BCI” — work. “And it’s also a critical technology for AR and VR in the long run. Because the problems of input are a big challenge there.”

Mark Zuckerberg AR glasses F8 Zuckerberg recently said that the goal with AR was for it to work inside glasses “we all want” to wear. Getty

Zuckerberg and other Facebook executives have said that the goal for AR is to have a pair of lightweight glasses that can display virtual objects onto the world around you. The nascent technology is also being worked on by tech titans like Apple and Microsoft along with startups like Snapchat and Magic Leap.

The first AR-equipped eyewear will likely feature some sort of brain-controlled input, according to Schroepfer.

“If you are just able to move your eyes and do a single click from your brain, which is just a single-bit signal, I’ve now just rebuilt the mouse,” he said.

For Building 8’s first brain-scanning tech, Dugan and Chevillet stressed that the sensor they build won’t be able to listen in on all of a person’s thoughts. It will rather focus on transmitting text you think “right before you would say it out loud,” according to Chevillet, who likened the concept to “decoding imagined speech.”

“The signal we’re trying to decode is the signal you’ve already giving intentionally,” said Dugan. She said that the sensor will be able to pair with a device like a laptop or smartphone and function like dictating to Apple’s Siri without your voice.

Along with Chevillet’s brain-to-text sensor, the second Building 8 project aims to let you “hear through your skin” and is being led by Freddy Abnousi, an interventional cardiologist who previously worked at Stanford. His product will likely take the shape of some sort of wearable, like a vest or armband, that vibrates to convey words into the human brain.

He described physical touch as “this innate way to communicate that we’ve been using for generations, but we’ve stepped away from it recently as we’ve become more screen-based.”

The goal is for the device to be “just part of you,” he said. “It’s very natural if you think about it.”

Dugan sees the two projects, which are just the first of others Building 8 is working on but won’t talk about yet, as complementary to each other. One is focused on deciphering what the brain wants to say, while the other is trying to send unspoken thoughts from the body to the brain.

“There’s an interesting similarity in that they’re both communication mechanisms, just in different forms,” she said. “It’s about giving users more alternatives to having input and output into their devices.”

While Dugan said that Facebook’s brain interface would first likely help people who have communication disorders, she acknowledged that the potential for the technology is open-ended. There are massive privacy implications that come with Facebook having access to your thoughts, but for now, Dugan is betting that the positive outcomes will outweigh any negatives.

“I feel tremendously optimistic,” she said.

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Here are the stocks millennials love more than people over 30 do, according to trading app Robinhood

snap bannerBusiness Insider

Robinhood, the app that lets you trade stocks without paying fees, has been a runaway hit with millennials, who have driven the startup to a reported $1.3 billion valuation.

The thinking behind Robinhood was that younger people would want to trade stocks differently: namely on their phones and without the fees. But are the stocks they trade different as well?

To answer that question, we asked Dr. Sahill Poddar, a data scientist at Robinhood, to crunch the numbers. By and large, the top stocks millennials held (by dollar amount) were similar to those of people over 30. But millennials were almost twice as likely to have stock from computer chip designers AMD and Nvidia. Conversely, those over 30 were almost twice as likely to hold Yahoo.

In terms of the top 10 stocks, Twitter and gold (via JNUG) made the over-30 list, but didn’t appear on the 30-and-under one, whereas Google (GOOGL) saw the reverse.

“Overall, millennials trade more often than non-millennials (2.75 times more), but the average dollar amount per trade is half,” according to Poddar.

It’s worth noting that Robinhood is a new platform, so you might expect the popular stocks to skew toward things like technology. But still, the differences between the millennial and over-30 crowd are instructive in understanding what different generations think of the stocks.

With that in mind, here are the top 10 stocks millennials love on Robinhood (by dollar amount):

No. 10: Google (GOOGL)

No. 10: Google (GOOGL)

Reuters

No. 9: Netflix (NFLX)

No. 9: Netflix (NFLX)

Netflix

No. 8: SPDR S&P 500 trust ETF (SPY)

No. 8: SPDR S&P 500 trust ETF (SPY)

Yahoo Finance

This ETF is designed to track the S&P 500.

No. 7: Snap (SNAP)

No. 6: Nvidia (NVDA)

No. 5: Tesla (TSLA)

No. 5: Tesla (TSLA)

Thomson Reuters

No. 4: Facebook (FB)

No. 4: Facebook (FB)

Thomson Reuters

No. 3: Apple (AAPL)

No. 2: Amazon (AMZN)

No. 2: Amazon (AMZN)

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (left) and exec Joe Lewis (right)Getty/ Joe Scarnici / Stringer

No. 1: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)

No. 1: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)

Thomson Reuters

Top stocks held by non-millennials on Robinhood (by dollar amount)

Top stocks held by non-millennials on Robinhood (by dollar amount)

Apple

  1. Apple (AAPL)
  2. Amazon (AMZN)
  3. Tesla (TSLA)
  4. Facebook (FB)
  5. Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)
  6. Nvidia (NVDA)
  7. Snap (SNAP)
  8. Netflix (NFLX)
  9. Twitter (TWTR)
  10. Direxion Daily Junior Gold Miners Bull (JNUG)

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It’s a make-or-break moment for Samsung with the launch of the Galaxy S8

DJ Koh, Samsung president of mobile communications, shows the Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones during the Samsung Unpacked event in New York City, United States March 29, 2017. Samsung Mobile CEO DJ Koh with the Galaxy S8. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Samsung’s big test is coming in less than a week.

On April 21, customers will get their hands on the Galaxy S8, Samsung’s first flagship phone since the embarrassing Galaxy Note 7 debacle that damaged the company’s reputation and wiped about $17 billion from its value last year.

Not a good look.

But early impressions of the Galaxy S8 have been amazing.

From a design perspective, the phone features a gorgeous curved screen that takes up almost the entire front of the phone. (Samsung calls it an “Infinity Display” because it gives you the impression that there are minimal borders on the sides.) It’s also made from all glass and metal, with a svelte body that feels great in the hand or pocket.

Overall, the phone features a larger screen in a slim and light package. The iPhone looks chunky by comparison. The Galaxy S8 is the early favorite for the best phone of 2017.

Plus, there are loads of thoughtful hardware innovations like wireless charging and a top-of-the-line camera that has yet to be beaten by competitors. Even after last year’s stumbles, it feels like Samsung is gearing up for a major redemption thanks to the Galaxy S8. (As long as the battery doesn’t explode again, of course.)

Still, there are a few concerns ahead of the launch. Samsung was forced to admit Tuesday that its new voice assistant Bixby won’t be ready when the phone launches. That’s probably a good thing, given that Bixby struggled to work properly in an early demo I saw a few weeks ago. But it’s an embarrassing admission by Samsung that it can’t keep pace with the growing voice-control category dominated by Amazon, Apple, and Google.

Samsung’s decision to create Bixby didn’t make much sense in the first place, since the phone will also ship with Google Assistant, Android’s excellent digital helper. That threatens to confuse users with two different assistants on the same device. Good luck with that.

And until Bixby does launch with a software update later this spring, the dedicated Bixby button on the side of the phone won’t serve a purpose at all. That’s another bad look at a time Samsung needs to really wow users again to make up for last year’s embarrassments.

All that said, the Galaxy S8 will likely live up to most of its expectations. Samsung hasn’t commented specifically on demand, but did say the phone saw growth in pre-orders in the US over last year’s Galaxy S7, which was also well received.

If I had to bet, most people will look beyond the relatively minor software flubs Samsung is making with the Galaxy S8 and instead focus on the innovative hardware and design. Frankly, the iPhone has never looked so far behind in those categories.

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