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Archive for April, 2020

Good morning

Based on our over 40 years of crisis management, restructuring and enterprise sale experience, we have never seen a financial crisis where uncertainty is greater than it is now.  Business leaders know that their enterprises will take a major economic hit, but they simply do not know how large or when it will be, where it will hurt most, or how long it will last. That uncertainty is causing businesses to “freeze” their decision-making.

Gerbsman Partners believes that “freezing in place” will worsen financial and human outcomes and may even be fatal for some businesses. We strongly recommend that companies review their contingent expenses, revenue prospects, liabilities, and creditor and senior lender issues and plan for the worst case.

Investors, board members, senior management and lenders must develop a crisis plans “NOW” for under-performing, under-capitalized and distressed companies. Plans will change as new information emerges, but implementing a crisis planning process immediately is vital, as it drives stakeholders to face hard realities and to take key actions early.

Gerbsman Partners and its Board of Intellectual Capital can help you develop action plans for maximizing and monetizing enterprise value, and then implement those plans.

We look forward to assisting.

Best

Steven R. Gerbsman – Principal, Gerbsman Partners

Robert R. Tillman – Member of Gerbsman Partners Board of Intellectual Capital

 

Terminating/Restructuring Prohibitive Real Estate, License, Payables & Contingent Liabilities

Gerbsman Partners has been involved with numerous national and international equity sponsors, senior/junior lenders, investment banks and equipment lessors in the restructuring or termination of various balance sheet issues for their technology, life science, medical device, cyber security, solar and cleantech portfolio companies. 

These companies were not necessarily in crisis, but had cash (in some cases significant cash reserves) and/or investor groups that were about to provide additional funding. In order to stabilize their Go-Forward-Plan and maximize cash resources for future growth, there were specific needs to address Balance Sheet and Contingent Liability issues as soon as possible.

Some of these areas where Gerbsman Partners has assisted, these companies have been in the process of termination, restructuring and/or reduction of:

 

Prohibitive Executory Real Estate Leases, Computer and Hardware-related Leases and Senior/Sub-debt Obligations

Gerbsman Partners was the “innovator” in creating strategies to terminate or restructure prohibitive real estate leases and senior and sub-debt obligations.

To date, we have terminated or restructured $810 million of such obligations for private and public companies, and which has allowed them to return to financial viability.

 

Accounts/Trade Payable Obligations

Companies in a crisis, turnaround or restructuring situation typically have account and trade payable obligations that become prohibitive for the viability of the company on a go-forward-basis. Gerbsman Partners has successfully negotiated mutually beneficial restructurings that allowed all parties to maximize value based on the reality or practicality of the situation.

 

Software and Technology-related Licenses 

As per the above, software and technology-related licenses need to be restructured/terminated in order for additional capital to be invested in restructured companies. Gerbsman Partners has a significant, successful track record in these areas.

 

About Gerbsman Partners

Gerbsman Partners focuses on maximizing enterprise value for stakeholders and shareholders in underperforming, undercapitalized and undervalued companies and their intellectual properties. Since 2001, Gerbsman Partners has successfully maximized the values of 109 companies in a wide and diverse spectrum of industries. In the process, GP has successfully restructured/terminated over $810 million of real estate executor contracts and equipment lease/sub-debt obligations, and has assisted in over $2.3 billion of financings, restructurings and M&A transactions.

Gerbsman Partners has offices and strategic alliances in Boston, New York, Washington DC, McLean VA, San Francisco, Orange County, Europe and Israel.

 

 

 

 

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Here’s what stylist Lauren Rothman is shopping for right now

Each week, we’re catching up with local stylists to discuss life at home, go-to loungewear and newfound obsessions during the coronavirus crisis.

Lauren Rothman in her closet
Fashion consultant Lauren Rothman has spent most of her at-home time shopping within her closet, instead of outside of it. In the right, Rothman shows off a sequin jumpsuit she planned on wearing for her birthday celebration. (Photos courtesy of Lauren Rothman)

While browsing through spring collections at local boutiques may not be an option right now, that doesn’t mean shopping is a thing of the past. Whether it’s self-care products, desk organizers or the perfect work-from-home outfit, many are continuing to find the items that make them look and feel their very best in the midst of this global crisis.

Lauren Rothman, fashion consultant and founder of Styleauteur, knows this firsthand, as she’s been working with companies virtually to rediscover the looks and regimens that work best for all employees, ultimately improving overall work ethic during this trying time.

Below, she shares her thoughts on current trends, must-have items and the showstopping outfit she plans on donning once Virginia’s stay-at-home order is lifted.

desk in a closet
Photo courtesy of Lauren Rothman
On the new normal: 

I spend so much more time seated now! I am online with clients almost every day doing sessions in style coaching, closet organizing and virtual shopping. I feel fortunate to be leading seminars over Zoom to help companies define work-from-home attire and empower their employees to practice self-care, and also be present in the midst of multitasking during this challenging time.

On what shopping looks like today:

I am definitely shopping less, and am helping everyone make the most out of what they already own. I have been shopping my closet more than anywhere else. My Lauren Moshi face mask (spray painted with red lips) is a new highlight in my wardrobe and Walmart is retail therapy—I recently grabbed a neon yellow bikini for less than $20 on my way to pay for groceries.

Also, I am helping my clients shop for WFH lounge and exercise clothes—golf attire is high on the list for many!

face mask with lips
Photo courtesy of Lauren Rothman
On self-care:

Doing my nails and creating my Zoom-friendly beauty routine is fun. About once a week, I use my Beachwaver and indulge my hair in fabulous waves. Exercise is key too.

On WFH attire:

Harem pants and jumpsuits are my staples. I live in a lot of basics like T-shirts, casual jeans and statement earrings. My fuzzy UGG slippers with glittery stars that my husband bought me for Hanukkah bring me daily joy too.

On the latest must-shop styles and sales:

A face mask is the hot accessory of the moment! Shopping my Instagram feed is one of my favorite new activities. And, I love supporting local businesses and have worked with stores to curate items for my clients that they then try on at home via video.

Plus, department stores are having terrific specials and the return process remains easy. Sephora is also having some awesome beauty deals if you’re looking for that right now.

On the look she’s most excited to show off when the pandemic ends:

I missed having a birthday party this month—I had a multi-color sequin jumpsuit all picked out and I can’t wait to add heels and give it a spin outside of my closet!

To learn more about how NoVA’s most stylish women are adapting to the coronavirus crisis, subscribe to our Shopping newsletter. 

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Good morning

Based on our over 40 years of crisis management, restructuring and enterprise sale experience, we have never seen a financial crisis where uncertainty is greater than it is now.  Business leaders know that their enterprises will take a major economic hit, but they simply do not know how large or when it will be, where it will hurt most, or how long it will last. That uncertainty is causing businesses to “freeze” their decision-making.

Gerbsman Partners believes that “freezing in place” will worsen financial and human outcomes and may even be fatal for some businesses. We strongly recommend that companies review their contingent expenses, revenue prospects, liabilities, and creditor and senior lender issues and plan for the worst case.

Investors, board members, senior management and lenders must develop a crisis plans “NOW” for under-performing, under-capitalized and distressed companies. Plans will change as new information emerges, but implementing a crisis planning process immediately is vital, as it drives stakeholders to face hard realities and to take key actions early.

Gerbsman Partners and its Board of Intellectual Capital can help you develop action plans for maximizing and monetizing enterprise value, and then implement those plans.

We look forward to assisting.

Best

Steven R. Gerbsman – Principal, Gerbsman Partners

Robert R. Tillman – Member of Gerbsman Partners Board of Intellectual Capital

 

Terminating/Restructuring Prohibitive Real Estate, License, Payables & Contingent Liabilities

Gerbsman Partners has been involved with numerous national and international equity sponsors, senior/junior lenders, investment banks and equipment lessors in the restructuring or termination of various balance sheet issues for their technology, life science, medical device, cyber security, solar and cleantech portfolio companies. 

These companies were not necessarily in crisis, but had cash (in some cases significant cash reserves) and/or investor groups that were about to provide additional funding. In order to stabilize their Go-Forward-Plan and maximize cash resources for future growth, there were specific needs to address Balance Sheet and Contingent Liability issues as soon as possible.

Some of these areas where Gerbsman Partners has assisted, these companies have been in the process of termination, restructuring and/or reduction of:

 

Prohibitive Executory Real Estate Leases, Computer and Hardware-related Leases and Senior/Sub-debt Obligations

Gerbsman Partners was the “innovator” in creating strategies to terminate or restructure prohibitive real estate leases and senior and sub-debt obligations.

To date, we have terminated or restructured $810 million of such obligations for private and public companies, and which has allowed them to return to financial viability.

 

Accounts/Trade Payable Obligations

Companies in a crisis, turnaround or restructuring situation typically have account and trade payable obligations that become prohibitive for the viability of the company on a go-forward-basis. Gerbsman Partners has successfully negotiated mutually beneficial restructurings that allowed all parties to maximize value based on the reality or practicality of the situation.

 

Software and Technology-related Licenses 

As per the above, software and technology-related licenses need to be restructured/terminated in order for additional capital to be invested in restructured companies. Gerbsman Partners has a significant, successful track record in these areas.

 

About Gerbsman Partners

Gerbsman Partners focuses on maximizing enterprise value for stakeholders and shareholders in underperforming, undercapitalized and undervalued companies and their intellectual properties. Since 2001, Gerbsman Partners has successfully maximized the values of 109 companies in a wide and diverse spectrum of industries. In the process, GP has successfully restructured/terminated over $810 million of real estate executor contracts and equipment lease/sub-debt obligations, and has assisted in over $2.3 billion of financings, restructurings and M&A transactions.

Gerbsman Partners has offices and strategic alliances in Boston, New York, Washington DC, McLean VA, San Francisco, Orange County, Europe and Israel.

 

 

 

 

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IMG
Fenwick & West Silicon Valley Venture Capital Flash Report – First Quarter 2020
By Cynthia Clarfield Hess, Mark A. Leahy, Barry J. Kramer and Khang Tran

View the full report.

Background
This survey is a special interim report to highlight changes in the Silicon Valley venture capital environment in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. To facilitate analysis, we are providing information on a monthly basis, rather than the typical quarterly basis. We are also providing monthly data for the comparable period in 2019.

Key Findings

  • Q1 2020 saw a reduction in the number of financings, and a decline in financing price increases, as the quarter progressed.
  • In January 2020 there were 126 venture financings in Silicon Valley—the largest number of venture financings in a single month in at least five years—before declining to 60 in February 2020 and to 44 in March 2020. By comparison, there were 61 venture financings in March 2019.
  • The Fenwick & West Venture Capital Barometer showed that while the average price increase in January 2020 was 117%, it declined to 76% in February 2020 and declined further to 46% in March 2020. By comparison, the average price increase in March 2019 was 63%.
  • Q1 2020 did not show a significant change in non-price terms.
Full Report

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Where is VC funding headed post corona?

We’ll face some shocks to the economic system, but true to tech and venture, many VCs are looking at the upside.

 

Image via Shutterstock.com

In the Israeli tech community, there has been an underlying sense the other shoe was going to drop regarding the end of continued growth.

And now we’ve been hit with a black swan in the form of the coronavirus pandemic, which could plunge the world into a significant economic downturn.

Historically speaking, funding for startups dried up following the dot.com bust, 9/11 and the 2008 recession. Today, many of the most valuable companies are technology companies that were initially venture backed.

But the amount of money invested into high-risk, high-growth startups will ultimately take a hit.

Some see this as an opportunity. After all, some of the world’s most successful companies began during economic downturns.

“Some of the best, most enduring tech innovation comes during survivor mode. I believe that a new wave of innovation will come after this.”

There will always be entrepreneurs with the chutzpah to face uncertainty during times like this, and investors who will back them.

We’re all looking for guidance and insight during this stressful period. Below, several investors based in the US who are active in the Israeli tech space share their insights on where they see things heading.

It’s guaranteed we’ll face some shocks to the economic system, but true to tech and venture, these investors are looking at the upside.

A 6- to 12-month outlook

According to Liron Winberg-Retzkin, general manager of the 365x scaleup program in New York, Most companies will survive this epidemic crisis and will come out of it even stronger. Some of them will even have fewer competitors. The ones that won’t survive most likely were doomed to fail anyway and this is just a catalyzer.”

She adds that there is money out there waiting to be invested.

“Many funds were raised just recently, so obviously some of it will be saved for follow-up rounds but the rest of it needs to go somewhere. Tech investors such as VCs and angels are risk takers by nature,” Winberg-Retzkin says.

“On a different note, some of the qualities of entrepreneurs are persistence and resilience. They don’t choose the obvious nor the easy path to begin with. They have the qualities to overcome obstacles and for most of them this will just be a bump in the road.”

Maniv Mobility Managing Director Michael Granoff

Maniv Mobility Managing Director Michael Granoff believes that during the next few months “assuming normal life begins to resume in the summer, it will still be a time of retrenchment for tech overall. Many investors will want to gauge the macroeconomic damage before making large new commitments, but at the same time, there is likely to be a rush of pent-up creativity from the founder inspired by such a black-swan event. So, I think for discerning but aggressive investors, there will be opportunities.”

Oliver Mitchell, an investor who has focused heavily in mobility and robotics, states: “I think this period will be a defining moment in world history, whereby we will group events as pre- and post- corona. Likewise, the tech economics in the US and Israel will be affected. We will see a lot of short-term fallout, but the winners will be the companies that adapt quickly and take advantage of new market trends such as remote workflows and automatic practices.”

A view from the Bay Area is also important given that an overwhelming amount of the money in venture comes from that ecosystem.

Oded Hermoni, general partner and cofounder of J Ventures

Oded Hermoni, general partner and cofounder of J Ventures, presented a sobering view.

“In the short term, with funds there will be an almost complete hold on new investments and focus on current portfolio, and startups will try to stretch their runway to 12 to 18 months. This will include layoffs or salary reductions, or both, and employees — if they are not laid off — will have to make some adjustments.

“In six to 12 months, if the corona isolation will be over, the funds will get back to investing, and the terms of rounds will be adjusted – up to 50 percent down. This will happen both in Israel and the US.”

Verticals thriving in the post-coronavirus world

Many of the verticals that investors believe will succeed in a post coronavirus economy seem intuitive regarding where the world is heading.

Verticals including biotech/healthcare, retail/e-commerce, video communication, and education were common. Other verticals mentioned were virtual offices, telehealth, computer vision, agriculture and solutions that focused on supply chains.

However, investor Inbar Haram, managing partner of INcapital Ventures, looked to address this from a different perspective.

“I don’t think it’s a matter of verticals. I believe that companies with strong, agile management, and ability to pivot to new/different business models will win. Companies need to think creatively how to adjust to the new reality and find ways to leverage the resources they have so that they can continue to grow.”

Advice for Israeli founders looking to enter US market: Savlanut!

Entrepreneurs could benefit from this piece of advice from investors who weathered downturns in the past: Wait and see how things develop.

Controversially, some American VCs have urged their startups to capitalize on market conditions now. But generally, Mitchell’s advice (“Be patient and conserve capital; the USA and the world are on pause”) is for the level headed.

Jenny Belotserkovsky, partner and founder of Jemm Ventures

Jenny Belotserkovsky, partner and founder of Jemm Ventures, states: “I would recommend to start building relationships with investors or business partners now but enter the market once the worst has subsided. Right now, valuations are 15 to 20% lower for most tech sectors and businesses are waiting out on the uncertainty if not already downsizing/shutting down.”

As they say in Hebrew “savlanut” (patience)!

There may be some opportunities, however, in less impacted verticals.

“Startups which can provide compelling near-term efficiencies, especially in the B2B category, are going to have an easier time getting traction than new consumer offerings in the medium term,” says Granoff.

He believes that businesses will be looking to reduce operating costs and consumers will take a while to regain an appetite for new products.

The silver lining

Optimists tend to be more successful, and what is the narrative of Israel but finding the good in the struggle? No one can accuse these investors of being cynical or pessimistic.

Yasmin Lukatz, founder and executive director of Israel Collaboration Network.

Yasmin Lukatz, founder and executive director of ICON (Israel Collaboration Network) based in the Bay Area believes a positive aspect of this crisis could be “companies getting leaner and more efficient, less competition and less noise, and more remote work.”

Lukatz thinks there will be “a lot of empathy toward parents working full time — understanding the double, even triple workload they have. Crisis breeds innovation. I suspect we’ll see some new, exciting industries that we can’t even imagine yet emerging. Crisis also tends to bring out the best in people.… I hope we can hold on to this spirit far after the virus has died down.”

As Winberg-Retzkin reflects, “Some of the best-known companies in the world were founded during tough economic times. It will force companies to innovate more with less resources.”

It’s not so much about having a rosy outlook; there are real economic ramifications.

Haram believes that “we will see more reasonable valuations that are based on actual revenues and performance. It’s a much-needed correction that we were waiting to see. Prices of companies skyrocketed in the last year and it wasn’t a healthy situation for companies or investors.”

This could usher in a time of unity in both countries as well, according to Hermoni. He believes the positive outcome is “solidarity, understanding that not everyone in the US and Israel is getting the same treatment and should have the approach of joining forces to fight the pandemic across the board.”

A dose of reality

Belotserkovsky has a millennial perspective.

“I think this situation is a dose of reality that many people have not experienced for a long time, if ever. For Israelis who deal with a constant threat to their existence, this time may not be as shocking as for Americans who are used to comfortable living and faintly remember the Great Recession or 9/11.

“Three weeks ago, I could order food delivery online and get it within 30 minutes in San Francisco. Now there are grocery shortages and no available online delivery options. How quickly we went from exuberance of consumption to survivor mode, taking away all the instant gratification and easy access to in person entertainment, active social life, and other basic things we took for granted.

“However, some of the best, most enduring tech innovation comes during survivor mode. I believe that a new wave of innovation will come after this and hopefully focus on deeper, more global problems to solve.”

Post-pandemic world

The world is still trying to make sense of these rapidly changing events. But there are some trends that seem to point to what a post-coronavirus world would look like.

“I don’t think that even this experience will diminish the yearning for human contact, even in the context of business,” says Granoff. “But I do think it will bring a greater recognition of what can realistically be done remotely, as people are relying so heavily on video conferencing in this period. I think Zoom will continue to thrive in the post-COVID era.”

Indeed, all the investors agree that remote working has become the effective “new normal.”

“I think that some of the changes that we’re seeing in the workplace are here to stay,” says Haram.“I believe that companies will develop a new online culture that is respectful of employees’ time and employers will measure actual performance rather than physical presence.”

Winberg-Retzkin sums up with this idea: “I hope what will happen as a result of the pandemic is that more and more businesses will adopt remote work. Startups are already tapping into remote work. I think we have all learned in the past few weeks that if you have a viable Internet connection you can work from anywhere.”

Lukatz sums up with her observation that “we are a generation that will have experienced a pandemic firsthand. This will leave an indelible mark on us. Experiencing something is very different than just reading about it. I think businesses will try to have a bigger cushion, more cash reserves, more solid contingency plans, and more and more of us will be working and meeting from home.

“I think we will see fewer mega networking events and conferences for a while, and it will take some time, if ever, to see even small ceremonious gestures like a handshake or the exchange of a business card, to reemerge. We will find new ways of connecting, both online and in person.”

Jonathan “Yoni” Frenkel heads a digital marketing agency, YKC Media, that focuses on engaging millennial and tech professionals through content. He’s been involved in the New York-Israeli tech community for many years and previously held roles as a nonprofit professional at both the IAC Dor Chadash and AIPAC.

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A special Zoom talk and Q&A for J-Ventures portfolio companies and LPs with our community member: 

 

Steven R. Gerbsman
Crisis/Turnaround CEO/Restructuring Professional, Investment Banker and Angel Investor

 

Identifying the early warning signs and maximizing value of distressed portfolio companies
A talk delivered by Steven R. Gerbsman of Gerbsman Partners on potential pitfalls of startups, emerging growth, and middle market companies. This presentation is currently being used at the Stanford University Engineering and Business Schools via the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP) and Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD).

 

 

Details

Monday, April 20, 2020
1 p.m. PT

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/6479063661?pwd=Y2NuSjhZNVpvRnRBQ2ZGSTlBMUdxQT09

Meeting ID: 647 906 3661
Password: 1016

Looking forward to seeing you!

 

 

Steven R. Gerbsman is an internationally recognized Crisis/Turnaround CEO/Restructuring Professional, Private Investment Banker and Angel Investor who has been involved in maximizing enterprise value, stakeholder and shareholder value in a broad variety of industries. He has worked with a wide spectrum of senior and junior lenders, bondholder groups, venture capital and private equity sources, private investors and institutional groups. Mr. Gerbsman has over 51 years of senior management, marketing, sales and finance experience and has been involved in various business and investment ventures as an office, director, consultant and investor, both in the US and internationally.

Since 1980, he has been in the business of maximizing enterprise value for highly leveraged, under-valued, under-performing and under-capitalized technology, digital marketing, life science, medical device, cyber security, fuel cell and solar energy companies and their Intellectual Property, as well as assisting technology, digital marketing, cyber security and medical device Intellectual Property companies with access to capital markets, strategic alliances, M&A, distribution of content and licensing.

To date, Mr. Gerbsman has been involved in over $2.3 billion of restructuring, financing and M&A transactions, terminating/restructuring in excess of $810 million of real estate, sub-debt and equipment lease executory contracts and since 2001, has maximized enterprise value for over 109 companies and their Intellectual Property. In 2000, he also began focusing on Israeli and European technology and life science companies, with the objective of providing access to the US capital markets and developing strategic alliances, M&A and licensing opportunities for them.

J-Ventures is the first primarily Global Jewish VC. Based in Silicon Valley J-Ventures acts as a “Mensch empowered VC Fund” with unique access to deals, experts and markets across different global communities. By building an engaging community of top investors from different GEOs we connect the current fragmented Jewish communities and give back to the community to support unity. 

 

 

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WHY BUSINESSES SHOULD ACCELERATE THEIR COMMUNICATIONS NOW

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts”.

                                                                          Winston Churchill

I’ve always loved this quote from a man I have long admired. I’ve referred to it many times whenever business gets especially difficult. There has never been a more appropriate time to think of Sir Winston’s words.

Counter-intuitive– In golf it is called “counter-intuitive”. Swing hard and the ball goes nowhere. Swing easily and the ball goes a mile.

In crises the natural inclination for most businesses is to cut back on every expense, marketing communications chief among them. In my 40+ years in communications I’ve seen too many CEO’s adopt a bunker mentality; hunker down, avoid costs and whatever you do, do not communicate with anyone until the trouble passes. This approach is wrong and can cause lasting damage.

In fact, now is absolutely the right time to increase your communications, but in the most strategic and cost-effective way possible. Here’s the way to go about it:

Build a Plan

Step 1- Prioritize your audiences; customers/clients, employees, vendors, federal/state/local governments, and the step

Step 2- Target Messaging. What are the three most important messages you want to communicate to each audience. Whatever you do be authentic, transparent and sensitive

Step 3- Communications Techniques. Determine, what are the best ways to reach each of your target audiences. Include both traditional and digital approaches

The Good NewsYou can build a communications program today at very little cost and with great effectiveness.

What You Can Do Today

  1. CEO Communications- This is by far, the most important step for any CEO. People are starved for leadership. Those who reach out and communicate to target audiences with compassion, concern, and calm will stand out. Authenticity, transparency and frequency are what counts now. CEO’s who do this well will not only build their businesses brand but their own as well. CEO’s will become recognized as being among the new generation of leaders. Mario Cuomo, Governor of New York State and Jamie Dimon, CEO of Chase Bank are prime examples great communicators.
  2. Digital Communications- Businesses can reach their target audiences through a variety of effective and low cost platforms. Start with LinkedIn. If your business has pages on Facebook, Instagram, Snap, etc., use them.
  3. Broadcast- Business news networks such as CNBC as well as general news outlets from MSNBC to FOX need interviews with CEO’s who can talk articulately about business issues impacting governmental policies to consumers
  4. Advertising- For those who have the budget consider both digital and traditional advertising outlets. But messaging should change frequently to make sure you are current. Charles Schwab, Invesco and Progressive Insurance are companies who continue to advertise but have correctly changed their message to reflect current times.

Now is the time for CEO leadership. Take the counter-intuitive route. Communicate, Communicate, Communicate.

Don Middleberg

Don Middleberg is regarded as one of the nations leading public relations executives, renowned for developing some of the most creative and powerful communications programs for such companies as American Express, Consumer Reports, Gartner, IBM, Reuters, and United Airlines.

Middleberg and Associates, founded in 1989, was named “Best PR Agency of the Year” in 1999. In 2000, the company became Euro RSCG Middleberg when it was acquired by Euro RSCG, the communications division of Havas, the world’s sixth-largest communications group. 

In 2009 Don Middleberg merged his second agency, Middleberg Communications, with Laundry Service, a digital marketing agency. Within six years the firm grew from 3 employees to over 600 in 4 countries and was named to Ad Age’s 10 Best Digital Agencies. In 2016 Middleberg sold this agency to Wasserman Group. Don is currently providing marketing communications consulting for several organizations in consumer technology and B2B.

A noted author and lecturer on public relations, Don, together with Professor Steve Ross of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, co-authored the groundbreaking study, “The Media in Cyberspace.” Don is regularly called upon for commentary by numerous magazines and newspapers, and has appeared on CNBC, C/Net, CNN, and National Public Radio.

 

 

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