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Posts Tagged ‘Intel’

Here is an article from SF Chronicle´s tech section worth reading.

“Intel Corp. and 24 venture capital firms will invest $3.5 billion in U.S. technology startups over the next two years, as part of a broad initiative to boost the nation’s competitiveness and create jobs.

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Here is a good article written by Chris O’Brien, San Jose Mercury News.

“Last week, I reviewed my predictions for 2009. And by grading myself generously, I got 3.5 out of 9. So now it’s on to 2010, when hopefully my foresight, and the valley’s economy, will improve.

It’s tempting to pick some easy targets to inflate my score. But instead, I’m going to make some daring picks, again, because when it comes to punditry, it’s always better to wrong than boring. Or something like that.

So, onward:

1. Palm will be sold.

Sad to say, but it’s inevitable. This will be the year this valley icon ceases to be an independent company. The launch of the Palm Pre and Pixi were valiant efforts. They created an exciting mobile platform and should be valuable to someone else. But sales of the Pre are already stalling. And so is cash flow.

There are plenty of potential buyers out there, from other mobile companies like Motorola and Nokia to other tech biggies like Hewlett-Packard and Dell, which need to get deeper into the mobile space.

2. There will be at least four valley-based green-tech IPOs.

Everyone is predicting a big comeback for the IPO this year. I don’t think that will happen for Silicon Valley. But I think green-tech will be the exception. I had started writing this before Solyndra filed for its IPO. So I’ve only got three to go! Who are the other candidates? Tesla and Silver Springs Networks seem to be increasingly good bets. The fourth will be a dark horse.

3. Intel settles

everything.

The deal with AMD was the first step to putting Intel’s long-running legal feuds in the past. Yes, the legal thicket seem to be getting worse with the filing of the Federal Trade Commission’s case against Intel. But the economy is warming back up, and so are computer and chip sales. Intel will make the smart move by settling these cases so it can focus on reaping the benefits of an improving economy.

4. The mythical beasts will arrive: the Apple Tablet and the Google Phone.

My colleague, Troy Wolverton, says nay, the Google phone will remain a mirage. Indeed, the existence of these two products has been long rumored and much denied. But the increasing chatter about both leads me to believe we’ll see them in 2010.

The intriguing question is: How much will they cost? Apple has recently overcharged for new products like the iPhone, and then brought the price down. I wouldn’t be surprised if the same happens with the tablet.

For Google, there’s a radical notion making its way around the valley: What if Google gave away its phone for free, hoping to make money off mobile advertising? Now, that would be truly disruptive. It has the billions in the bank to underwrite such a plan for several years. But does it have the guts?

5. Facebook and LinkedIn won’t go public.

These social networking companies are in no hurry. Facebook is still tweaking its revenue model, as is LinkedIn. When their revenues pick up steam, they’ll eventually bump into some federal rules that require certain financial disclosures, just as Google did early last decade. But they’ve got at least another year before they have to worry about that. In the meantime, their founders are in no rush to give up the control they would lose by going public.

Indeed, I think that sentiment is widespread among many tech startups. Why rush into an IPO? And this is part of the reason why I don’t expect tech IPOs to come roaring back this year. Even Zynga, the social gaming company and long-rumored IPO candidate, recently took a big investment from a Russian firm so it could reduce pressures to go public. Don’t expect to party like it’s 1999.

6. Jobs will post a slight gain.

As a guide, let’s look at the last two recessions in Silicon Valley. The one in the early 1990s was relatively shallow. The number of jobs peaked in August 1990 and then declined for 18 months, before beginning a rebound that lasted the rest of the decade.

Following the dot-com bust, we hit a job peak in December 2000, and then hit bottom 37 months later, in January 2004.

This current downturn falls in between at the moment. Jobs in Silicon Valley peaked in December 2007, so we’ve been headed down for about 23 months. Though that’s complicated, because in recent months, the job numbers have bounced up and down. Still, this downturn feels less severe in the valley than the dot-com bust. So I expect that 2010 is the year we see a net gain in jobs for Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

7. Twitter.

Can I do a predictions list and not say something about Twitter? Probably not, so here goes. Twitter’s traffic will decline this year. We’ve seen it stall already in the U.S. and it’s begun to flatten around the globe. I say this, though I remain completely obsessed with Twitter and consider it indispensable at this point.

Unfortunately for Twitter, I never actually visit its site. Rather, I use one of the many third-party applications to write, view and filter tweets. That’s good for me. Bad for Twitter, because it will make it harder for them to make money from me. There’s mumblings recently that not only is Twitter getting revenue, but it may be nearly profitable. But the upside may be limited if Twitter’s traffic is flattening.

8. Google gets hit with an antitrust suit.

The company narrowly skirted a federal anti-trust action in 2008 when it scuttled a search deal with Yahoo. But even though it’s doing its best to cozy up to the Obama administration, and trying to play up it’s “do no evil” motto, there’s some indication that federal antitrust regulators have Google in their cross hairs. Maybe it will be over the controversial Google Book settlement. Maybe it will be over its acquisition of mobile advertising leader AdMob. Or with Google going on an acquisition binge, it could be over some other deal on the horizon. But expect Google and the feds to lock horns in 2010.

9. The number of public companies in Silicon Valley continues to fall.

It’s been falling since 2000. And I see no reason that it will stop this year. That means that acquisitions will rise and consolidation will continue. And while IPOs will reappear, they won’t be enough to make up for the number of public companies that are acquired or go bankrupt.

10. And finally, I’ll end by going way out on a limb: Cisco Systems will buy Dell.

Think about it. Hewlett Packard has been gearing up in recent years to invade Cisco’s turf by moving into the networking space. This is Cisco’s greatest challenge in almost a decade. Cisco will need to respond by buying a PC company both to achieve greater scale and to match the range of products it can offer customers. Cisco has about five times as much market value as Dell, which has been struggling for years to regain its leadership in the PC business, which it lost to HP.

Put Cisco’s line of networking equipment and annual revenue of $36 billion with Dell’s PCs and $61 billion in annual revenue, and you still have a company a bit smaller than HP and its $118 million in annual revenue. But it gets them close.

Cisco’s Chambers has also recently ruled out launching or buying a mobile computing device. But, never say never in the tech world. This an area where both HP, Cisco and Dell need to be in the coming decade.”

This article was posted originally in American Chronicle.

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As the economic slump is fading off, tech titans have amassed cash for possible takeovers. Here is an opionion further explaining this from 24/7 Wall Street Blog.

“The economy is obviously getting better, so long as you are not one of the unemployed or about to lose your job.  Now with more than a 50% rally from the March lows and a Dow Jones Industrial Average challenging the 10,000 level, suddenly everyone wants to put on their investment banker hats again and look for buyers and buyout candidates after deals are announced.  This week’s Dell Inc. (NASDAQ: DELL) deal for Perot Systems Corp. (NASDAQ: PER) was a $3.9 billion acquisition versus $12.7 billion in cash and equivalents held at the end of the quarter.  The Oracle Corp. (NASDAQ: ORCL) deal for Sun Microsystems Inc. (NASDAQ: JAVA) is valued at $7.4 billion, or $5.6 billion net of Sun’s cash and debt.  We went back through our list from September 2, 2009 where we noted that outside of the financials  in the 20 largest US companies had a cash hoard of $335 billion that could be used for mergers and acquisitions, and that is not accounting for lines of credit, stock or debt that could be sold, and other means of financing a deal.  While nowhere near all of the cash will ever be used, many companies could pay big dividends before any tax changes.

So we wanted to look through the technology sector and after we looked through the top 100 markets caps in our 24/7 Wall St. Real-Time 500 we added a few new additions in the tech sector that still had over $5 billion in cash.  Out if the $335 billion from those in the top twenty, we broke out Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT), International Business Machines (NYSE: IBM), Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL), Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG), Cisco Systems Inc. (NASDAQ: CSCO), Intel Corp. (NASDAQ: INTC), Oracle Corp. (NASDAQ: ORCL).  Even after a huge rally, $335 billion and then some could go a very long way for strategic and bolt-on acquisitions as a positioning strategy for the next decade.  Now, going further down the list of the top 100 companies with $5 billion or more in cash from tech companies alone adds in Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), QUALCOMM Inc. (NASDAQ: QCOM), EMC Corporation (NYSE: EMC), and Yahoo! Inc. (NASDAQ: YHOO). When we tally up all the cash, there is over $260 billion available from these few tech companies that could be deployed for mergers, acquisitions, or the good old dividends.  Again, that is before tallying up credit lines, factoring, debt sales, and other financing methods.

Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ) had almost $25 billion in cash and long-term investments.  Now that it has migrated away from just selling PCs and printers, we think that there will be a rather long lull before H-P tries to match its big buyout of EDS even if Dell is tip-toeing into IT-services and consulting with Perot.  But in the end, what we think may not matter.  Nearly $25 billion in cash when you know you will be profitable ahead leaves a lot of room to go out make purchases.

QUALCOMM Inc. (NASDAQ: QCOM) was the 29th largest company as of Wednesday with a $74.12 billion market cap. If you tally up its cash, short-term and long-term investments, it is sitting on almost $15 billion in cash and equivalents as of last quarter.  After all the lawsuits that the Jacobs team are settled, it might consider a way to deploy capital to get around future patent cases.  If only it was possible, although anything is possible.”

Read the full article here.

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Here is article from USA Today. As the crisis starts to ebb out, the downsizing has produced piles of cash at some companies.

“SAN FRANCISCO — There could be a thaw in the months-long stagnant market for tech mergers and acquisition.

Data-storage companies EMC (EMC) and NetApp are dueling to buy Data Domain for at least $1.8 billion. Last week, chipmaker Intel (INTC) said it would buy testing and development software maker Wind River Systems for $884 million.

The quarter’s big catch was when Oracle (ORCL) snapped up Sun Microsystems for $7.4 billion.

While hardly a buying spree, the uptick could signal a break for what has been a sluggish tech M&A market since the third quarter of last year.

So far, $17.9 billion has been spent on tech mergers in the U.S. in the current quarter — more than the previous two quarters combined, according to market researcher Thomson Reuters.

The activity reflects one byproduct of a sour economy: Big tech companies sitting on piles of cash are willing to spend some of it to aggressively pick up innovative start-ups as well as rivals with customers and market share.

The deals come at a time when venture capital funding is scarce for start-ups and there are scant initial public offerings.

“People historically make their money when they invest consistently, even during downturns,” says Keith Larson, vice president of Intel Capital, the company’s venture-capital arm. The company has said that it will spend $7 billion over two years to build advanced manufacturing facilities in the U.S.

“Almost the worst thing you can do is pull back during a downturn and miss out on buying opportunities,” Larson says. “We have a multiyear road map on the technology side.”

Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers, who has navigated the venerable network-equipment maker through several downturns, has said companies willing to take calculated risks often emerge stronger from recessions.

A few established companies with ample cash reserves this year have bolstered their war chests with the intention of snapping up companies.

Cisco (CSCO), which sold $4 billion in bonds in February, has about $33.5 billion in cash reserves. It acquired Pure Digital Technologies, maker of the popular Flip video camera, for $590 million.

“If you have cash, it is a good time to fortify product lines and fuel growth,” says Cynthia Ringo, managing partner for VC firm DBL Investors.

So far this quarter, there have been 239 deals in the U.S., including the Oracle-Sun blockbuster. In the first three months of this year, there were 313 deals.”

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