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First-day preorders for the iPhone X sell out in minutes, Apple says demand is ‘off the charts’

iphone x YouTube/MKBHD

  • The iPhone X became available for preorder early Friday morning.
  • Only people who ordered in the first few minutes will get their preorder the first day it comes out, though.
  • Apple stores will also have stock next Friday, though Apple advises to get in line “early.”

Apple’s most advanced iPhone saw its shipping times slip to weeks in the minutes after it first went up for preorder on Friday morning.

The iPhone X starts at $999 and comes in two colors, with each color coming in two models with different amounts of storage.

Less than an hour after launch, models for all four US carriers on Apple’s online store were showing delivery times weeks after the device’s November 3 launch date.

In some cases, Apple’s website now says the iPhone X would be delivered in “2-3 weeks.” Other people got confirmation messages that said their iPhone X wouldn’t ship for four to five weeks.

Some people on social media reported issues with the official Apple Store app, which Apple retail officials had called the fastest way to preorder. Carriers such as AT&T also appeared to have limited inventory.

In a statement sent to media outlets, an Apple spokesperson said that demand was “off the charts.”

“We’re working hard to get this revolutionary new product into the hands of every customer who wants one, as quickly as possible,” the statement continued, mentioning that Apple stores will have stock on November 3.

iPhone X preorders Screenshot

The iPhone X will be in short supply for the rest of the year, according to reports from Apple’s factories in Asia. The reason for the shortage is that several of Apple’s components, like the 3D True Depth camera, are delicate and difficult to manufacture.

One analyst predicted that only 2 million to 3 million iPhone X units would be shipped by launch time.

The iPhone X is desired by Apple fans for several reasons:

  • It’s Apple’s highest-end iPhone.
  • It features a visually different design from older iPhones.
  • The screen covers a much larger percentage of the front than that of older iPhones.
  • The screen uses a new technology called OLED that sports blacker blacks and other benefits.
  • It has a longer battery life than the iPhone 7.
  • It has a 3D depth-sensing camera on the front of the phone called TrueDepth.
  • TrueDepth is used to unlock the phone, taking the place of the fingerprint sensor.

If you weren’t lucky enough to nab a preorder, your best bet is to line up at an Apple store or another authorized retailer on Friday. Just get there early.

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Here’s everything Apple announced at its big iPhone launch event

Tim Cook Apple event iPhone XApple CEO Tim Cook and design chief Jony Ive display the new iPhone X.Justin Sullivan/Getty

Apple unveiled not one, but three new iPhones at its hardware event on Tuesday.

The iPhone X, iPhone 8, and iPhone 8 Plus join a slew of new products and services from Apple, many of which are set to roll out as early as this Friday.

Along with the new phones, Apple announced its first foray into wireless charging, new facial-recognition technology, and a 4K Apple TV. Plus, Apple finally added a cellular connection to its new Apple Watch Series 3.

Here are all the things Apple announced at Tuesday’s event

Apple announced its latest and greatest iPhone, the iPhone X.

Apple announced its latest and greatest iPhone, the iPhone X.

Justin Sullivan/Getty

The new iPhone X — pronounced “iPhone ten” — features a strikingly different design from its predecessors like the iPhone 7. It has a 5.8-inch screen that Apple calls a “Super Retina Display,” which utilizes a superior screen technology called OLED. The iPhone X comes in just two colors for now: black, and white.

You can preorder the iPhone X on October 27. It ships on November 3, and has a starting price of $999 for 64GB of storage.

There are also two more new iPhones: iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.

There are also two more new iPhones: iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.

Apple

Like its predecessor the iPhone 7, the iPhone 8 comes in two varieties: a standard 4.7-inch model, and a larger 5.5-inch “Plus” model. Apple is offering the two iPhone 8 models in three colors: silver, matte black, and a new gold color. Both the iPhone 8 and the 8 Plus have a glass back and both support the Qi wireless charging standard.

The iPhone 8 and the iPhone 8 Plus start at $699 and arrive on September 22.

The Apple Watch Series 3 is Apple’s third-generation smartwatch.

The Apple Watch Series 3 is Apple's third-generation smartwatch.

Justin Sullivan/Getty

Apple Watch Series 3 is the first Apple Watch, and the first Watch with cellular built in. The watch can make and receive calls allowing you to leave your phone at home, and will have the same number as your iPhone. The new watch comes in three colors: a new gold aluminum finish, silver, and space gray.

Apple Watch Series 3 will be available to order on Friday and will start at $329 — the watch with cellular will cost $399. It will be available a week later, on September 22.

Apple is launching its own heart rate study for Apple Watch users.

Apple is launching its own heart rate study for Apple Watch users.

Apple

The new Apple Watch Series 3 will feature an enhanced heart rate app, watch will notify you when it detects an elevated heart rate specifically when you’re not active. The sensor will also be able to analyze heart rhythm, so Apple is launching the Apple Heart Study in partnership with Stanford University. The study will use data from Apple Watch to analyze cardiac arrhythmia and will be available on the App Store later this year.

There’s a new Apple TV that will stream video in ultra-sharp 4K resolution.

There's a new Apple TV that will stream video in ultra-sharp 4K resolution.

Justin Sullivan/Getty

The new Apple TV 4K will be able to stream 4K – or UHD (ultra high-definition) – resolution video, which is sharper than the full-HD 1080p resolution from previous Apple TV models. It will also support HDR (high dynamic range) to produce better colors and contrast between light and dark areas of a scene.

The Apple TV 4K will be able to stream live video, like sports, in 4K HDR from Apple TV apps. It will be available to buy for $179 and you can pre-order it starting on September 15 — it ships a week later.

Apple made its first wireless charging pad called AirPower.

Apple made its first wireless charging pad called AirPower.

Apple

AirPower is a wireless charging pad that will be large and powerful enough to charge your new iPhone — either the new iPhone 8 or the high-end iPhone X — as well as your Apple Watch Series 3 and AirPods at the same time.

Unfortunately, it sounds like AirPower won’t arrive until 2018. Apple must first work with the regulatory committee that oversees the Qi wireless charging standard to implement a new standard it developed for AirPower. Apple didn’t say how much AirPower would cost or when it will be available.

iOS 11 will arrive on your iPhone and iPad September 19.

iOS 11 will arrive on your iPhone and iPad September 19.

Apple

Apple’s smartphone operating system, iOS 11, will arrive on phones September 19. The new OS features person-to-person payments in Apple Pay, a refreshed Control Center, a revamped Apple Maps, support for augmented reality (AR) applications, and much more.

Apple’s smartwatch operating system, WatchOS 4, will also launch on the September 19.

MacOS High Sierra will be available to download on September 25.

MacOS High Sierra will be available to download on September 25.

Justin Sullivan/Getty

Apple’s latest operating system for Mac laptops and desktops, MacOS High Sierra, will be available to download on Monday, September 25.

MacOS High Sierra will include “Autoplay Blocking,” which stops media from autoplaying across the internet; an improved Photos app; an overhauled core file system, support for high-end virtual reality; and more.

There’s a new system to unlock your iPhone X called FaceID.

There's a new system to unlock your iPhone X called FaceID.

Justin Sullivan/Getty

Face ID is the new way to unlock your phone on the iPhone X. Face ID replaces Touch ID, which scans your fingerprint to unlock the iPhone. Since the new iPhone X doesn’t have a physical home button or a Touch ID fingerprint sensor, Face ID will be the only way to securely lock and unlock the iPhone X.

Apple says Face ID will be able to handle and recognize any changes to your face, like beards, different haircuts, and putting on or taking off glasses and hats. And the technology will recognize your face in the day and night time.

Animoji are animated emojis you can control with your face.

Animoji are animated emojis you can control with your face.

Justin Sullivan/Getty

Animoji use Apple’s new facial recognition software to turn you into animated emojis that can make facial expressions and talk. There are a dozen different Animojis, including the monkey, panda, alien, and fox.

Changes are coming to Apple’s retail stores.

Changes are coming to Apple's retail stores.

Chris Hondros/Getty

Apple’s most famous store design feature will return late next year: The “cube” on 5th Avenue in New York City. Apple will open up its surrounding plaza and let light into the underground store. Apple is also opening a new flagship store on Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

Apple’s retail boss Angela Ahrendts also announced another feature coming to Apple stores called “Today at Apple,” which gives customers tips for their devices, such as how to take great photos with photo walks around the town. There are also classes where people can learn to code and teachers can learn about the latest education apps.

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Apple and Stanford team up to study how Apple Watch might detect stroke condition

Chances are, you’re probably not wearing a dedicated heart monitor capable of measuring abnormal heart rhythms. If you have an Apple Watch, you just might be.

Apple Inc. is partnering with researchers at Stanford Hospital and Boston-based telemedicine vendor American Well to launch a new study into whether the Apple Watch can accurately detect irregular heartbeats, which can be a precursor to strokes, CNBC reports, citing two unnamed sources.

One of Apple’s goals with the Apple Watch was “performing some measurements of your health that people were not measuring, at least continually,” CEO Tim Cook told Fortune in an interview published this week. “Like your heart. Very few people wore heart monitors. We’re extremely interested in this area. And yes it is a business opportunity.”

Earlier this year, San Francisco-based startup Cardiogram gathered 139 million heart rate measurements from 6,158 Apple Watch users and found they were able to detect irregular heartbeats with 97 percent accuracy.

Apple has a vested interest in turning the Apple Watch from a nice-to-have fitness gadget into a must-have health monitoring wearable. On an earnings call in August, Cook said Apple Watch sales had grown 50 percent year-over-year, but declined to provide specific numbers.

The company is also reportedly pursuing the “holy grail” of life sciences— a noninvasive blood-sugar monitor to help those suffering from diabetes. Apple reportedly has hired at least 30 biomedical engineers to work on the glucose monitoring task.

In June, Apple hired Sumbul Desai, the executive director of Stanford Medicine’s center for digital health, to help lead the company’s Health division. Part of Desai’s work at Stanford centered around the Apple Watch and how its sensors could be used to detect specific health conditions.

Apple and health insurer Aetna have also reportedly held secret meetings in an effort to bring the Apple Watch to Aetna’s more than 23 million customers, an initiative that could launch next year. Such a partnership would be another way for Apple to make its Watch a “must own” for consumers.

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Now is the best time to sell your iPhone

The iPhone 7. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Have you been thinking about selling off your iPhone for one reason or another? Maybe you plan on upgrading to that swanky iPhone 8 we’ve been hearing about, or maybe you just want to make some money off your old handset.

Whatever your situation might be, if you’re thinking about selling your iPhone, you might want to pull the trigger sooner rather than later.

Every time Apple announces new iPhones, the sellback prices of older iPhone models drop considerably — sometimes by $100 or more — across most sites, from Gazelle to eBay and the like.

If you need a good place to sell back your iPhone, you’ll find plenty of options. You’ll probably get the most money from eBay, but several other sites like Gazelle, Glyde, Swappa, buymyi, and even Amazon make it incredibly easy, as most of them will offer to send you a box and a label to ship off your iPhone for free, and either pay you via PayPal, Amazon.com gift card, or a check in the mail just a few days later.

Keep in mind: The new iPhones will likely be announced in the next few weeks, and released shortly thereafter. So if this iPhone you plan on selling is the main phone you use, make sure you’re going to be okay if you’re phone-less for awhile, or just have a backup phone ready.

 

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Microsoft’s new standalone keyboard has one the best new features from Apple’s MacBook Pro

One of the best new features that Apple added to its 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro is a Touch ID fingerprint scanner on the keyboard. And now, Microsoft has also added a fingerprint scanner on its new Modern Keyboard to work with Windows 10 computers.

microsoft modern keyboardYouTube/Microsoft

The fingerprint sensor on Microsoft new $129 Modern Keyboard, called Fingerprint ID, has its own button on the right of the right “Alt” key.

Microsoft already offers an easy keyboard-less way to unlock your computer called Windows Hello, which uses a webcam and facial recognition to unlock your computer. That’s great for computers that have built-in webcams, which many laptops have. However, the monitor I use on my Windows 10 desktop doesn’t have a built-in webcam, so I can’t use Windows Hello. And because typing in a password every time I want to unlock my computer is a pain, I don’t use a password, which is a terrible, insecure idea.

Microsoft’s new Modern Keyboard with a fingerprint scanner is the solution.

windows hello Windows Hello on a Windows 10 computer. YouTube/Microsoft

Touch ID on the MacBook Pro, and now Microsoft’s new Modern Keyboard, cuts out the need to type in your password to log in to your computer. If that doesn’t seem like a big deal, look at your smartphone and imagine if you had to tap in your PIN number every time you wanted to unlock it instead of using its fingerprint scanner. Seems like a pain, doesn’t it?

It might be true that you don’t unlock your computer as often as you unlock your smartphone, but your computer password if likely longer than your smartphone PIN, which could include four to six numbers. With that in mind, the fingerprint scanner on Microsoft’s new keyboard is a great shortcut to unlock your computer.

The Modern Keyboard costs $129 and will be available to buy soon.

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The creator of Android explains how his new phone can take on Apple and Samsung

Andy Rubin at wired business conference Andy Rubin at the Wired Business Conference with the new Essential Phone. Getty Images for Wired

Andy Rubin is best known as the guy who created Android, sold it to Google, and nurtured it into the most popular smartphone operating system on the planet.

But Rubin left Google back in 2014, and now he’s on his own.

His latest gig is Essential, a startup he runs as CEO that’s trying to become a new kind of gadgets company. It starts with a phone, called the Essential PH-1, and the plan is to expand into smart appliances and cars from there.

Rubin spoke Wednesday at the Wired Business Conference in New York and shed a bit more light on Essential’s plans. After the Essential Phone launches this summer, the company plans to release Home, a voice-controlled hub for all the connected appliances in your house. Rubin claims Home will be compatible with the wide variety of smart home platforms, ranging from Apple’s HomeKit to Samsung’s SmartThings, even though it’d take a wild level of technical wizardy to pull it off. Many are skeptical he can pull it off. He calls this new platform Ambient OS.

Beyond that, Rubin teased that he’d like Essential to tackle the car, which is increasingly coming into focus as an area of growth for tech companies.

And questions remain how the Essential Phone, which costs $699, can find success in a market dominated by Apple and Samsung.

Business Insider and some other members of the press spoke with Rubin following his Wired talk. Below is a transcript of that conversation, which has been edited for length and clarity. (I’ve labeled each journalist’s question as just “Question” since so many people were in the room asking questions. I put my name on the questions I asked.)

Q&A with Andy Rubin, CEO of Essential

Steve Kovach: I want to talk more about Ambient OS. You were talking a lot about how you’re really confident you’re going to be able to stitch all these various platforms together.

Andy Rubin: I didn’t say I was confident. I’m definitely going for it.

Kovach: If I’m understanding it correctly, especially with Apple, it’s actually impossible. What they allow people to build into now doesn’t allow what you want to do. Does this thing fall apart if they say no to you?

Rubin: You have to understand this approach. There’s a client and a server. And what Apple has with HomeKit is a bunch of individual consumer electronics companies enabling HomeKit with their products. I don’t know what the percentages are, but they don’t all only speak HomeKit. They speak a whole lot of other stuff as well. And what Apple is trying to do is trying to be the screen that drives these things. And that’s excluding anybody in “Android Land” or Windows from driving those things. So the natural effect will be for those companies to support other products as well, and they’re the ones that are plugging into Apple’s APIs. So the trick that I talked about on stage is: I can produce the same APIs. And I can call it Essential Kit. And those same exact APIs that someone has already developed for their Sonos thing or whatever this point product is, I’m compatible with.

Kovach: But isn’t that just another product like Samsung’s SmartThings?

Rubin: No, no, no, no. You know what this is? This is [like] Windows emulation [on a Mac]. This is Windows emulation for IoT. APIs for all these people who are building these islands. And if I emulate eight things and turn it on, I control 100,000 devices.

Kovach: And have you been able to do that yet in testing?

Rubin: I haven’t launched a product. I’m teasing a product, but it’s going to be awesome. These are all forward-looking statements.

Question: How far in advance are you teasing?

essential home hub A rendering of what Essential Home will look like. Essential

Rubin: We have round LCDs — big ones. What’s after that is basically everything that’s in a smartphone. Right? There’s a bunch of cool things about starting a company today. I have a system in my lobby where I can print badges for people. There’s some startup company whose job it is to do lobby registration now. And when I used to start companies, those guys didn’t exist. But the other thing that happened, obviously, is smartphones have driven the supply base, based on the volume of the component tree of smartphones. And you’ll find those things going into a lot of products like these home assistant products. So it’s kind of a new era as far as leveraging the economies of scale of smartphones into these other products.

Question: So Essential Home is a touch interface. Is it also a microphone?

Rubin: Yeah it has far-field speech recognition. It has an array of microphones.

Question: Is there any plan to add video chat to something like that?

Rubin: Really good question. So once you do this job of bridging these islands, you kind of rise above all these other UIs, and you become a kind of holistic UI for every other product that might be in your life. So if you think of it purely from a UI perspective: Who is your UI developer? I actually thing developing for smartphones is too difficult. It’s almost like you have to go to school to learn how to be an iOS developer or learn how to be an Android developer. The good ones have four or five years of experience, and the industry is not that old. So the reason we created a new OS is to basically solve the UI problem and redefine the definition of who a developer is. I want the guy who owns the home to be a developer, in some regard. I can tell you today, there’s a $13 billion industry of Crestron or AMX or Control 4, and they’re drilling holes in your wall and installing screens in your home. That’s an outdated approach. But the guys that are doing the UIs for those are the same guys that are drilling the holes in your wall. There’s this whole installer thing with these high-end homes which is not a mass-market consumer value proposition. So I need to change who the installer is. And I think we’ve built enough technology for a consumer to kind of do a drag and drop.

Question: There’s this argument that’s been out there that innovation in smartphones has peaked, that they’ve already gotten so good and can do so many things. Where do you see things going? Where does it go from here?

essential ph-1 colors The Essential Phone. Essential

Rubin: When there’s this duopoly with these two guys owning 40% of the market, this complacency sets in where people are like, “Oh what they’re building is good enough. I’ll just go to them.” And that’s the perfect time to start a company like this, when people are complacent and it needs to be disrupted. And the real answer is you guys and the consumers need to tell me if there’s enough new innovation in [the Essential Phone].

I think the 360 camera and the magnetic accessory bus is a pretty good example of the innovation we’re thinking about. And there’s gonna be a string of those things. Let me broadly position this: In the era where smartphones were new and everyone was upgrading from their feature phone to their smartphone for the first time, the product cycle was every six months. There’d be some new thing coming out, everyone’s excited, there was a bubble kind of feeling that you were involved in something completely new and exciting. And then once everybody who wanted a smartphone got one, we’re in a saturated market — at least in the first world. In saturated markets, the upgrade cycle is every 24 months. And the problem with the 24-month cycle, which happens to snap to the carriers’ [ownership] of the consumer, is the consumer doesn’t get to see the innovation. It’s still happening in the background, but it happens every 24 months in these very lumpy onstage announcements. I think there’s a way, and the reason we built this magnetic connector to continuously produce innovation and show it to the consumer happening in real time. It’s almost like software updates for hardware.

Andy Rubin at wired business conference Rubin and his Essential Phone. Getty Images for Wired

Question: Explain how the Essential Phone is different from a modular phone. From the consumer point of view, it’s, “I’m getting this phone and I can snap a camera on and I can snap on a better battery.” Does it matter if it’s magnetic or not?

Rubin: That’s a good question. It’s two things. It’s kind of the core to the way we designed this from a product design perspective. The first one is what’s “modular.” [Google] Ara was the definition of modular, which is you can remove a core component of the phone, like its processor, and replace it with a faster one. We’re not doing that. You buy a phone, the phone works great as a phone. We’re adding stuff onto it. So that’s why I prefer accessory bus as an example. So that’s modular versus accessory.

Now, connectors, in my view, are dumb because they get outdated. So a wireless connector is the holy grail. We’re close to that. We transmit power between two pins and everything else is wireless. Actually, the technology we’re using is wireless USB 3.0. So it’s 10 gigabits a second of USB, and we’ve built these transceivers that do that. The benefit of having a connectorless connector is I don’t suffer from what Moto Mod suffered from, which is every phone they come out with in the future has to have that 33-pin connector in exactly the same location so all the accessories you’ve invested in as a consumer still work. So they’ve painted themselves in the corner. They can never change the industrial design of their next phone because it has to match all these accessories. Or they have to trick the consumer into throwing away all their accessories and getting the new one that fits this new thing.

A completely wireless thing means I can come out with a phone that’s invisible. And as long as it has this magnetic area on it I can use this legacy of accessories that I’ve purchased. Again, this is a pro-consumer brand. It’s not easy to articulate. We’re trying to do right by the consumer where they don’t have to throw away their stuff every time there’s a connector change. Or get some weird dongle. True story, I went and bought one of those beautiful new MacBooks with the OLED TouchBar. And that’s when they changed to the USB-C thing. And in the IT department in my company I needed to plug in to the Ethernet to get the certificate for the new laptop, and I went to the Apple store and I said, “Do you have a USB-C to ethernet dongle?” And they said, “Oh no we don’t have that yet.” So I had to buy a USB-C to Thunderbolt dongle, and a Thunderbolt to Ethernet dongle. So I had two dongles plugged into each other. And that’s the point where I’m just not feeling too good about being a consumer of those products.

Question: Based on the conversations you had today and at the Code Conference, Essential is much more than just a phone company. How do you find that your brand is going to track these consumers?

Rubin: It’s anti-walled garden. We chose Android because that’s a big component of that. We have a team of engineers, a lot of them, doing the job of other people to make our products work with theirs. These other companies, especially the walled gardens, they’re sitting here with their ecosystem and they expect people to come to them. And they get to be the toll gate guys and say “yes” or “no.” So we’re actively going out and making our products work with other people’s products because we know that’s how our consumers want to live.

Kovach: You spoke a lot on stage today about home and the car as major new platforms, but you didn’t mention AR.

Rubin: There’s baby steps into AR, and then there’s all-in. Scoble’s all-in is the shower picture… so the glasses might come later. Cellphones have had augmented reality for a long time…

What the real question is: ‘What is the end product?’ What is the developer going to build with augmented reality? And so far I’ve seen interactive media… movies and game-like movies, where you’re both a participant and a viewer, which I think is a little too mixed reality for me. There’s a lean back where you’re a consumer of this stuff and it happens, or you’re a participant like a game. The mixed part of it hasn’t been proven yet.

I think when consumers are ready to wear things, whether it’s a motorcycle helmet that overlays a map… or if it’s some goggles that they’ll use for a board game… in the end for these big things I think…

One of the problems is the price. It’s just crazy. It’s not ready for prime time. There will be a day where you might have a head mounted display and it costs $199, and you just plug it into your cellphone. And it won’t be ‘I’m wearing this 24 hours a day.’ It’ll be, ‘It’s time to sit down and play Monopoly with the family or something.’ It actually might be more social than what you would do with VR.

Question: Is that why you started the 360 camera? Because it’s a taste of that?

Rubin: This is all speculation, but I’m hoping there’s going to be a format change in the future. I think I can kind of move the needle a little bit in that format change by taking the world’s largest mass-market product and adding something onto it, rather than trying to create something completely new. So it’s more of a slipstream approach.

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Apple is preparing an updated MacBook Pro for later this year

macbook pro Apple

Apple is planning to launch an updated version of the MacBook Pro later this year, according to a new report from Bloomberg ace Mark Gurman.

This updated MacBook Pro could feature a new Apple-designed chip designed for low-power consumption.

Apple designs the primary application processor chip inside of its iPhones, a major competitive advantage that allows Apple’s phones and tablets to boast better performance than Android devices.

Using that expertise from the iPhone, Apple is planning to add more Apple-designed silicon to the Mac, according to the Bloomberg report. The report notes Apple is not planning to dump Intel, which makes the processors for Macs, anytime in the near future, but that a new Apple-made chip might show up in the new version of the MacBook Pro that may release later this year, according to the report.

Instead, the new Apple chip, codenamed T310, will be based on the embedded processor currently used in the new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, which is used for the computer’s eponymous Touch Bar technology as well as Touch ID. In the new MacBook Pro coming later this year, the new Apple chip could run the laptop’s low-power mode to fetch emails and other data while the computer is asleep, leading to lower power consumption and better battery life.

Apple leadership has implied some of the reason for complaints about Apple’s latest laptops have been related to Intel chip limitations. Apple is also suing its primary mobile silicon partner, Qualcomm, for $1 billion.

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