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Posts Tagged ‘Luke Stangel’

Apple and Stanford team up to study how Apple Watch might detect stroke condition

Chances are, you’re probably not wearing a dedicated heart monitor capable of measuring abnormal heart rhythms. If you have an Apple Watch, you just might be.

Apple Inc. is partnering with researchers at Stanford Hospital and Boston-based telemedicine vendor American Well to launch a new study into whether the Apple Watch can accurately detect irregular heartbeats, which can be a precursor to strokes, CNBC reports, citing two unnamed sources.

One of Apple’s goals with the Apple Watch was “performing some measurements of your health that people were not measuring, at least continually,” CEO Tim Cook told Fortune in an interview published this week. “Like your heart. Very few people wore heart monitors. We’re extremely interested in this area. And yes it is a business opportunity.”

Earlier this year, San Francisco-based startup Cardiogram gathered 139 million heart rate measurements from 6,158 Apple Watch users and found they were able to detect irregular heartbeats with 97 percent accuracy.

Apple has a vested interest in turning the Apple Watch from a nice-to-have fitness gadget into a must-have health monitoring wearable. On an earnings call in August, Cook said Apple Watch sales had grown 50 percent year-over-year, but declined to provide specific numbers.

The company is also reportedly pursuing the “holy grail” of life sciences— a noninvasive blood-sugar monitor to help those suffering from diabetes. Apple reportedly has hired at least 30 biomedical engineers to work on the glucose monitoring task.

In June, Apple hired Sumbul Desai, the executive director of Stanford Medicine’s center for digital health, to help lead the company’s Health division. Part of Desai’s work at Stanford centered around the Apple Watch and how its sensors could be used to detect specific health conditions.

Apple and health insurer Aetna have also reportedly held secret meetings in an effort to bring the Apple Watch to Aetna’s more than 23 million customers, an initiative that could launch next year. Such a partnership would be another way for Apple to make its Watch a “must own” for consumers.

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Ben Horowitz warns startups: You’re worth less today, and you need to be OK with that

Andreessen Horowitz Partner Ben Horowitz says the fundraising environment for startups is particularly tough today. He says investors are increasingly pushing for more equity for less capital, and founders need to be OK with that.Andreessen Horowitz Partner Ben Horowitz says the fundraising environment for startups is particularly tough today. He says investors are increasingly pushing for more equity for less capital, and founders need to be OK with that.

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Contributing writer- Silicon Valley Business Journal

Legendary venture capitalist Ben Horowitz (who makes up the second half of Andreessen Horowitz) has a particularly bleak message for entrepreneurs raising money in the Valley right now: You’re probably worth less to investors today than you were the last time you raised money.

“If you are burning cash and running out of money, you are going to have to swallow your pride, face reality and raise money even if it hurts,” Horowitz wrote in a blog entry Tuesday. “Hoping that the fundraising climate will change before you die is a bad strategy because a dwindling cash balance will make it even more difficult to raise money than it already is, so even in a steady climate, your prospects will dim. You need to figure out how to stop the bleeding, as it is too late to prevent it from starting. Eating s— is horrible, but is far better than suicide.”

He’s partly talking to founders raising an A or B round—entrepreneurs who’ve been to the table at least once before, and raised earlier rounds at a particularly high valuation. The fundraising climate is tougher now, he says. Investors have more leverage and they’re increasingly pushing founders to accept “down rounds,” defined as funding that values their company for less than they were worth in a previous round.

“After, God willing, you successfully raise your round and it’s a down round or a disappointing round, you will need to explain things to your company,” Horowitz writes. “The best thing to do is to tell the truth. Yes, we did a down round. Yes, that kind of sucks. But no, it’s not the end of the world.”

Horowitz knows the feeling.

Twelve years ago, he and Marc Andreessen were entrepreneurs themselves, running a red-hot startup called Loudcloud. In June 2000, they raised $120 million from investors, at an $820 million valuation. By the end of the year, the dot-com bubble was popping fast, and they couldn’t raise another round. To stay afloat, they were forced to take the company public in 2001, at a $560 million valuation.

Describing that experience, Horowitz writes, “In some sense, you are like the captain of the Titanic. Had he not had the experience of being a ship captain for 25 years and never hit an iceberg, he would have seen the iceberg. Had you not had the experience of raising your last round so easily, you might have seen this round coming. But now is not the time to worry about that. Now is the time to make sure that your lifeboats are in order.”

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